Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Exclusive: Fred Murray would not be interviewed by detectives for 2 1/2 years.

Two independent sources now confirm a long rumored hitch in the Maura Murray case. A private investigator and a member of law enforcement claim Fred Murray refused to sit down for an interview with detectives working his daughter's case for a full two and a half years after she vanished in New Hampshire. And when he did, he brought two lawyers with him.

In the beginning days of Maura's disappearance, detectives tried to get Fred to open up about what was happening in Maura's life before she came to Haverhill. He refused to go into detail about any troubles, saying repeatedly that nothing that happened before mattered, that the only thing that mattered was that she was missing and they needed to find her. The detectives thought, as I do, that knowing what was happening in the woman's life prior to her disappearance might shed some light on where she was heading, and possibly what happened to her.

No explanation has been given as to why Fred refused to sit for a formal interview with detectives or why he brought a pair of lawyers with him when he finally agreed to it years later.

I would love to know Fred's side to this. I'm sure he has one. But, so far Fred and the extended Murray family have not replied to my requests for interviews. Likewise, Maura's close friends have stopped replying to requests as well.

22 comments:

  1. Wow! That's huge. I would love to hear his reasoning for that and what he had to say about what was going on in her life. I can't believe Fred Murray could be that shortsighted....

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  2. Not so huge when one considers that the security supervisor, "has never spoken to detectives working the case.",.

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  3. Yes, rather shocking, but then again, look at the Casey Anthony family and we may get a glimmer of non-cooperation when there is major dysfunction going on within the family dynamics.

    It's still a shame all around.

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  4. It has been 7 years since Maura disappeared. Maybe he would sit down and talk now? Emotions were raw back then.

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  5. Do you think it's still possible to find answers without the help of her family and friends?

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  6. Connie,

    Absolutely. Maura knew a lot of people. But it would certainly make things easier.

    -James

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  7. i think the dad knows more than hes saying. but i allso think maura ran off and is living another life. i think with her getting in trouble for using peoples credit cards and was asked to leave her other school and crashing 2 cars in a close time frame, that things got too much for her and she left.

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  8. Baffling! But what about the Mother?

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  9. Aud, her mother died a few years ago.

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  10. ...Which was also on Maura's 27th birthday

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  11. This is absolutely true, FM was the bane of Troop F Detectives since day 2.

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  12. Just found this website yesterday but have followed this case a little since 2008 when it was on CNN's website. There is so much new information here that has finally been clarified. I don't understand her father's behavior and his lack of cooperation could very well have prevented the finding of Maura during that critical 48 hour period.

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    1. Nope. LE didn't look for her during that time period. That's probably why FM has been so frustrated and refused to talk to them.

      The first 48:
      Officer responds to the accident scene. Does a quick search of the area, possibly with one other officer and one civilian. 15 hours later a "Be On the Look Out" (BOLO) is issued. 36 hours later Fish and Game finally perform a search of the area. This is when dogs tracked her for 100 yards and lost the scent. 48 hours later LE issues a statement that they believe Maura was in the area to run away or commit suicide.

      LE wasted the first 48 hours, not FM. FM has every right to hate them for the rest of his life based on those first 48 hours alone.

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  13. Very very interesting.

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  14. I lived in New Hampshire for almost 20 years, and I have had only two reasons to turn to the police for help...and was badly treated both times. Perhaps mistakenly, I thought it was because I'm a woman. The events were different, and took place in two towns in two different counties, but it was painful enough for me to leave New Hampshire without any homesickness, only regret for having been a resident there. I think of Maura often, and worry about her. I lived and worked near the area she went missing. F Troop doesn't have my sympathies...I would need to know the truth first. Has the Vidocq Society ever been requested? I wrote to the State police once, and to my not-surprised, didn't get a response. I had asked them if the FBI would be able to get involved. Anyone know if the FBI was approached - or the Vidocq Society?
    ps: Please, I don't want to be abrasive, I just can't get behind the "Fred wasn't helpful" thing.

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  15. "15 hours later a "Be On the Look Out" (BOLO) is issued." According to the incident report on the night of Maura's disappearance, a BOLO was issued shortly after the police arrived on the scene. It was issued within minutes, not hours.

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  16. I know this is not a popular viewpoint, but I think the police responded appropriately at the accident scene and in Maura's disappearance. Hindsight is 20/20, but at the time, they had no reason to believe she was a victim of foul play. The evidence pointed to a young, irresponsible drunk driver fleeing the scene to avoid a DUI. Of course her father and other family members wanted them to go all out and treat her disappearance like they would if the President's daughter went missing, but as the police well know, 99% of these missing persons cases resolve on their own within a few days. If the police went all out, as Maura's family wanted, their funds would be drained very quickly.

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  17. My feeling is that it took Fred Murray 2-1/2 years to agree to interview because he's an immature control freak, not because he's culpable in Maura's disappearance. He subconsciously believes that his own behavior caused Maura to flee and ultimately may have lead to her death. What father wants that on his conscience? It's much easier to vilify the police for the "inept" handling of the case. He's convinced himself that they are the enemy and must be treated as such.

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  18. ya something wrong here freds got some skelotons in his closet he may have been following her in his car and she didnt know it and he pulled up and lost it on her i think he knows alot more than he leading on and he say on the dissaperaed show wel just pound thru it ect... leads me to beleive theirs more under the surface the public does not know

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  19. I too would love to hear Fred's side to this. He's a smart man, he had to know that refusing to speak to the police for this long would reflect poorly on him, regardless of the reasoning behind it. This is all speculation (of course) but maybe he was avoiding the talks because he feels guilty, for the simple reason that he feels like he drove Maura away and doesn't want anyone to know about it.

    When she wrecked his car, she appeared to be dealing with a lot of other problems such as substance abuse, credit card fraud, relationship problems, and there's a chance she could have been kicked out of nursing school for the criminal charges. Maybe he said something to her in anger and feels like he's the reason she wanted to get away so badly.

    The way he acts in interviews, he glosses over the whole incident like it was no big deal (it was!)and they don't discuss her personal issues at the time, all of which are relevant to the case. Any father - my OWN father - could have blown up at me over any one of those things, especially wrecking his new car.

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  20. He refused to go into detail about any troubles, saying repeatedly that nothing that happened before mattered, that the only thing that mattered was that she was missing and they needed to find her. The detectives thought, as I do, that knowing what was happening in the woman's life prior to her disappearance might shed some light on where she was heading, and possibly what happened to her.

    Bingo. I've always felt the same way. He has always been adamant that "it doesn't matter" what the circumstances were prior to her disappearance. This always struck me is an absurd position to take. We don't know how relevant the period leading up to her disappearance was. We just don't know. But every unsolved disappearance, every unsolved murder, every unsolved kidnapping, requires a full investigation into what the person was doing before it happened. Unless the incident is so cut and dried that we know for a fact that it was a random event entirely unrelated to whatever else was going on in her life (and we certainly don't know in this case) piecing together those final few days is an absolute necessity.

    If I were her father, I would want to know everything I could about those final days and hours, because the answer might lay there. You simply cannot ignore the strange behaviour, deceptiveness, and obvious planning to get away (much less the excessive drinking and reckless, sometimes criminal behavior) that occurred in those few days and weeks before she disappeared.

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  21. I (opinion) believe that He knew his daughters problems and had been mopping them up, no matter how odd. Parent's often feel self blame because their offspring are being( bad!) medicating for escapism. You have two very(almost opposites) people in her actions. They completely go against her ideals. Good grades, West Point(?) star runner, nearly a RN. Bulimic, drinks, (supposedly) slept around. I don't mean to be distasteful, these are things that millions of people do daily. No judgment, but this isn't how I trained. I know she knew what was up, this is a incredible woman, no dummy, but she was letting herself down too. I'm sure with the rumors that have flown here, and the evidence, Fred needed a mouthpiece because he couldn't admit her downfalls at the time. I'll bet he thought she'd show up some day too. 2 years later, and he's a suspect? maybe, even though he's clean, just conveniently forgetful! Sorry for my bluntness, it's my greatest offender!

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