Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Ed Lanpher Speaks Out

I just got off the phone with retired chemist, Ed Lanpher. His name showed up in documents related to Maura's case as he was the only other person to FOIA Fred's Murray's case against the state of NH before me. I also wondered if he may be the man who calls himself "Pomkik," who has threatened my family.

Happy to report that Ed Lanpher is not Pomkik.

The 90 year old NH resident tells me he was interested in the Murray V. State of NH documents only because the decision in that case might help him gain access to public records in his home town (the judge's decision made public records more accessible.)

Lanpher was quite polite and believes he's anything but enigmatic.

62 comments:

  1. I cannot believe that you thought a 90 year old man was Pomkik. Didn't you go to Pomkiks blogspot page or whatever it was? Do you really think a 90 year old man would have that type of webpage? The crazy writing,upper/lowercase writing style? Would a 90 year old man even have a webpage? Do you think a 90 year old man would threaten your family?

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    1. No, I'm not constantly in a foul mood. But as I explained above, a 90 year old man being Pomkik is ridiculous. I wasn't the only one that thought so, when Mr.Renner first wrote about Ed Lanpher and Pomkik, some people had an opinion similar to mine.

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    2. Are you this obnoxious normally? ,How would anyone be able to stand you for more than 2 minutes?

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    3. Just because I have a difference of opinion, or don't agree with a theory doesn't make me obnoxious. You come off as rude for calling someone obnoxious because their opinion might not be the same as yours.

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    4. Gotta chime in here and back Becki up. The entire Ed Lanpher theory/ speculation was never even within the realm of plausibility. Didn't even pass the "straight face" test.

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  2. This is great follow-up, and goes to show that some things are impossible to guess at. Nobody, as far as I know, even came close to guessing at this motive.

    Think of all the missing pieces this and other cases have. It can feel very futile to try and solve them when you have just to little information.

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  3. Thanks for the follow up, James. Glad to see that even improbable leads are being followed up on--because that's the whole point. You don't pick and choose potential leads because of narrow-minded ideas and generalizations based on someone's age. We've seen older people and young children do all sorts of things we'd never expect. It's not a waste of time, especially considering how often I've read about leads that were legit, but not followed. Reporting and investigation is a science and the fact is that even improbable (meaning not impossible) leads need to be explored so that you can say you did your due diligence. Even the speculation put forth serves a purpose--to brainstorm, to ask questions, to get suggestions from others who may have different ideas.

    Once again, James, thanks for running this blog and continuing to post new information.

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    1. Sarah H, My first thought was that maybe Ed Lanpher had a younger relative that wanted access to Maura's records, but didn't want to use his/her real name to get the records, so maybe the relative asked Ed Lanpher to get the records for him/her. My problem with the initial posting of Ed Lanpher was that Mr.Renner wrote "One reader pointed out that "Pom" is short for a thermoplastic, Polyoxymethylene. Lanpher has a patent on a specific type of polymerized rubber and worked in thermoplastics until he blew up his lab

      "Kik" is the company abbreviation for Kunststoffen Industrie, a plastics company in the Netherlands, founded in 1968.". The whole theory that Pomkik was a name from a chemical compound and a lab from 1968 was ridiculous. Then I had a look a Pomkik's wordpress page, and it was obvious this wordpress page was not written by a 90 year old man.

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  4. TO pUT an_aNtIC DiSPosItIoN_ON
    tHAT //YoU// soMetIMes_SEeIng >.>.>ME<.<.< nevEr_|_|_shAll//_|_|_|_-_-_|_|_|_

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    1. Pomkik, I've just gotta ask this: Why is your avatar an image of a teen girl? I hope that's just you, and not some random pic you pulled off of Instagram.

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    2. Now that Pomkik has replied, does anyone commenting here see why I did not think Pomkik was a 90 year old man? All you have to do is click Pomkik's name to see his webpage.

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    3. I H0p3 ThAt's jusT y0u,,, aNd n0t
      S0m3 Rand0M pIC y0U PuLl3d 0Ff 0f InsTagraM
      //TO pUT an_aNtIC DiSPosItIoN_ON //
      bzZzZ //.//.\\.\\ >.>.>

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    4. Totally didn't answer my question. Oh well, keep doing whatever it is that you do.

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  5. I'm sure you've all read this by now, but I thought I would share it if not.
    Very interesting and helpful.

    http://www.bostonmagazine.com/news/article/2014/01/28/maura-murray/

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  6. I just made the mistake of visiting the official Facebook page, and it ticked me off enough that I need to post this somewhere. May as well be here. What has always driven me nuts about that and similar sites is how certain people react every time anyone wants to know about Maura's past, or posts about what problems she may have been facing. Those comments get deleted, and can make one the target of hostility. Yet the family and their allies allow endless speculation about the bus driver, about the guy in the trailer, about other locals who, as far as we know, had NOTHING to do with her disappearance, and in fact, all evidence points to them just trying to help in some small way.

    Poor old Butch got raked over the coals a million times and still does. All for the "crime" of stopping to talk to her, then having his wife call 911 to report it. Hardly the actions of a criminal intent on harming her. No wonder the locals are so angry and sick of hearing about it. Couple that with the trespassing and the attitudes demonstrated by the searchers towards some of the locals early on, and you can see exactly why the locals were alienated. If the family is so damned defensive about Maura's reputation, they should probably have shown a little concern for the reputations of everyone else involved.

    Even in the early Websleuths threads, any question or supposition about Maura's personal problems leading up to her disappearance was met with angry responses like "It doesn't matter!" and "STOP BLAMING THE VICTIM!" and nonsense like that. I realize now that her family and their allies were basically policing these message boards and badgering moderators to delete anything they didn't like. When that didn't work, they posted angry responses in an attempt to shame and intimidate whomever strayed from the official line. Of course, they could not keep that effort up indefinitely. Which is why in the past few years, we've finally seen some reasonable and open discussions take place. As a result, we learned more in the past 3 years than we did in the first 7.

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  7. Raging Ranter - Agree. Nicely put. I always think when people circle the wagons they are really protecting their opinions of themselves.

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  8. Anyone who thinks it isn't possible for someone to just disappear, get a load of this:

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/ontario-man-declared-dead-nearly-30-years-ago-found-alive-in-us/article20190287/

    Ontario man disappeared in 1977 after a barn fire was discovered on his property. He was declared dead in 1986. Found alive and well 3 weeks ago, living in the US, under an assumed name. Age 69. He was 32 when he disappeared. If he could pull it off for 37 years, why couldn't Maura do it for 10? I am not saying that is what I think happened. But it sure demonstrates the possibilities.

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    1. Seriously? You don't see any any difference between the disappearance of a man in 1977, and the disappearance of a young woman in 2004, who was part of a wide search by several law enforcement agencies, has had dozens of groups pop up on social media sites to compare notes about her, has had TV shows about her disappearance, and lately several "10 year retrospectives" by newspapers. Really?

      While I admit there is a possibility that she is living under an assumed name, I'm getting sick and tired of people just blowing off how easy it would be to do this.

      Banks want ID. Real ID, not easy to fake stuff. Fewer and fewer jobs pay by check. Most places want to do a direct deposit. Many apartment buildings require full background checks, social security numbers, etc.

      Again, I'm not saying it's impossible, but either she had help, or she is living COMPLETELY on the fringes of society now.

      2 things have made living under an assumed name much more difficult. 9/11, and the rise of identity theft. Before both of these things, yes, it was extremely easy to do. After this, not so much.

      Also, you didn't mention the most telling part of the article...

      "The investigation was reopened in July during a routine audit of the case and police say it was discovered the man, who was 32 at the time of his disappearance, was alive and living in the U.S. as Jeff Walton, 69."

      That story appeared in August. I'll do the math; That means that within ONE MONTH of a routine audit the police found him, now that we have this new-fangled technology that they didn't have in 1977. One month. And this was a routine audit of a case that nobody cared about, not a cold-case with documentaries being made about it.

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    2. They found him in ONE MONTH! If you ignore the previous 37 years, then your logic works just fine. By the way, a "rise in identity theft" does not make it less likely she is living under an assumed identity. It makes it more likely.

      However, I do not think that's what happened. I think she's dead in the woods, within a few miles of where she was last seen. Probably ran off into the woods and died that first night.

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    3. Yes, they found him in one month.

      From the article; "The investigation was reopened in July during a routine audit of the case". The article is from August. That is one month elapsed time, tops. The important part of that are the words "reopened" and "audit". "Reopened" means the case was *closed* at some point. As in "they are no longer looking for him". He was legally declared dead after 9 years by the court. That's an automatic, usually. So what you don't have is a man actively evading the police for 37 years, as you seem to be interpreting it. You have a man (in the 1970's, before we had any real technology in police work) who disappeared. The story doesn't say he was wanted by police in connection for a crime, or anything like that, only that he was reported missing. A grown man up and walking away, especially 30+ years ago, was not a crime. If the cops spent a month investigating I would be surprised. But giving your take on it the benefit of the doubt, let's say they looked for him until the courts declared him dead. That's 9 years (again, in the 70's before the police had any real tech). If there was no reason to believe he was murdered, the case would have ended right there. We KNOW that the case was closed at some point, because it was *reopened*. Fast forward to 2014, when police now have modern equipment. They are randomly auditing cases from the 70's (as they do, now that they have more tech), and found him WITHIN A MONTH. My logic stands. I might not have explained it well in my first comment.

      Also, I don't understand your logic with "By the way, a "rise in identity theft" does not make it less likely she is living under an assumed identity. It makes it more likely."

      First of all, it doesn't make it more or less likely. Either she did it or didn't. I doubt she made her decision based on identity theft trends. What is does make it is SIGNIFICANTLY harder to do, as the rise in identity theft has driven a huge surge of counter-identity theft systems. Passports have RFID now. Licenses have much more advanced holograms and anti-counterfeiting technology. Most banks require SSNs. People have locks on their credit history. There are computer algorithms that look specifically for this kind of activity. None of this is impossible to beat, but it takes skill, money, or connections. None of those things would be readily available to a young college girl. You could make a case for money, but we are talking a significant amount of it. A fake ID that will let you drink in a dive college bar in MA is cheap. A fake identity that will fool law enforcement and border guards, while you are actively being sought as a missing person is NOT cheap.

      Another analogy; If a neighborhood suddenly has a rash of burglaries, it doesn't make it more or less likely that someone passing through is going to break into a house. It does make it more difficult, as now people are locking their doors, putting better locks on them, and buying security systems. You see what I mean?

      And I didn't mean my above comments as an attack on you personally. I just see SO MANY people on this site who seem to think that getting a new identity is something you can walk into Walmart and do. It is actually much harder than most people realize.

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    4. His barn was on fire. He left, without explanation, to give the impression he died in the fire.

      Nine years later, perhaps in connection with a life insurance claim (an article mentioned his former "widow" returning the proceeds of a claim), he was declared legally dead.

      It seems that everything was resolved on his departure; he died in an fire and his remains were burned. Nothing leads me to believe that he was ever considered missing.

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    5. Nothing was resolved on Maura's departure. The mysterious nature of Maura's disappearance suggests that it was not the result of a plan.

      Maura had the means to create the impression that she died near the crash site. Using her belongings (i.e., her backpack, her gym bag, the bottles of alcohol, books, etc.) she could have suggested a specific manner of death. As a guide, she had with her a book about death in the wilderness of New Hampshire (Not Without Peril).

      In the alternative, Maura could have delayed her departure, first resolving the crash.

      Maura's disappearance remains unexplained. If she had planned to disappear, she probably would have constructed a scenario that explained her fate. For that reason -- and putting aside issues of motive and obtaining a new identity -- I consider a planned disappearance to be highly unlikely.

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  9. My two cents....or bitcoins....or whatever the kids are spending these days -

    America has an enormous population of illegal aliens (tens of millions), so I don't see staying under the radar as any kind of stretch.

    If MM is in the woods then someone put her there. Her movements and actions look nothing like suicide. She had a destination and after the wreck she headed there or towards the person that was there with her (Tandem Driver). If she is dead then the most likely scenario IMO is being hit while walking down the road at night, the driver freaking and hiding her body in the woods.

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    1. "If she is dead then the most likely scenario IMO is being hit while walking down the road at night, the driver freaking and hiding her body in the woods."

      Sounds like "I Know What You Did Last Summer."

      You make a good point about the ability to stay beneath the radar. If Maura had posed as an unlawful resident of this or another country, she would have a way to explain not having documentation. She could find an employer willing to accommodate her by paying her under the table, etc.

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    2. The illegal immigrant thing is apples and oranges. You are talking about well established communities of people of the same nationality helping each other out. The mutual support structure means they can fly below the radar. "I'll get you a fake drivers license so you can drive, but you have to give my nephew a place to stay. His uncle is running a restaurant that will pay your wife under the table." That type of thing. A white college girl doesn't just walk into the nearest supermercado and say "Hi I need to disappear. I don't speak your language or understand your culture, but I have a couple hundred bucks and a few bottles of booze. Can you help?" Whether they're Mexican, Chinese, or Russian, illegal immigrant communities are tight-knit, secretive, and rely on the mutual support of everyone to thrive.

      Again, I'm not saying it's impossible, but she either had help from someone with skills in this area, a lot of money, or connections. Or, as I said, she is living on the absolute fringes of society. Take any major city and look a a crime map. Find the area with the absolute highest rate of violent crime. THAT area is where you find jobs that pay under the table, apartments that don't do background checks, and places that cash checks without ID. A 20-something white college girl wouldn't last a month in these areas, AND she would stick out like a sore thumb.

      The only other place you can go "under the radar" is in extremely rural areas. But even in areas like that, finding work that pays under the table and not needing ID is rare. Plus, again, she would stick out. Look at Woodsville or Haverhill as perfect examples. Everyone knows everyone else, and their business. How long could an outsider hide in a place like that if they were actively being sought by law enforcement?

      And speaking of that, that is another thing that people need to come to grips with. There is a huge difference between a person wanting to live off the grid or below the radar who is not wanted by police, and someone who is. Especially someone who is, and has had national newspaper articles and TV shows about them.

      Maybe she learned to hunt, and is living way off the grid in a cave in the mountains, tanning hides for clothing, and hunting deer with a spear for food. When she needs the occasional thing she can't grow or hunt, she could always trade beaver pelts with the local shop keep. Makes about as much sense as her disappearing and living under an assumed name without any planning.

      I'm guessing that 90% of the people who comment on this blog live in the suburbs or a rural area, and have gotten all their knowledge of "going underground" from cop shows on TV. It's not like that. Not anymore anyway.

      My work deals (indirectly, but enough) with things like identity theft, and bypass of these kinds of systems. Now, I'm not going to out myself so you can verify that - you can either believe me or not - but I do know something about this, and it is just NOT as simple as people are making it out.

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    3. One more thing to put this in perspective.

      This is a girl who used stolen credit card numbers to order pizza that was delivered DIRECTLY TO HER ROOM.

      We are not talking about a master criminal here. Hell, we aren't even talking about someone with a good grasp on how fraud and police investigation work.

      So 3 months later she is suddenly able to slink away in the night, establish a new identity, and evade police who are actively looking for her for 10 years (including a recent resurgence in interest in the case, on the anniversary)?

      Personally? Even IF she was able to slip away and establish a new identity (with the help of someone else - that's the only way I buy it), there is no way that someone with a track record of screwing up and getting caught like she had, doesn't slip up in 10 years.

      I used to believe she had just run away. But as the years have passed, and more and more leads have ended at dead ends, and the straws people are grasping at get shorter and shorter, I'm having a harder time believing it.

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    4. "A white college girl doesn't just walk into the nearest supermercado and say 'Hi I need to disappear. I don't speak your language or understand your culture, but I have a couple hundred bucks and a few bottles of booze. Can you help?'"

      You are making a lot of assumptions. James' theory had Maura going to Canada, where "supermercados" are hard to find and where your hypothetical language barrier would not present an obstacle. Also, I would hope that Maura could make a better sales pitch than the one that you suppose.

      How about Maura posing as an unlawful resident of the United States from Canada? The point is, providing an unverifiable name (and not having a social security number) could be explained by posing as an unlawful resident.

      "Whether they're Mexican, Chinese, or Russian, illegal immigrant communities are tight-knit, secretive, and rely on the mutual support of everyone to thrive."

      Perhaps. But we are not discussing a community; we are discussing a person. If you mean to suggest that it takes a village to live as an unlawful resident, I disagree.

      "I'm guessing that 90% of the people who comment on this blog live in the suburbs or a rural area, and have gotten all their knowledge of 'going underground' from cop shows on TV. It's not like that. Not anymore anyway."

      I know more than one person living in the United States as an unlawful resident. Off hand, I can think of one who (using an admittedly false name) works at a restaurant and designs websites. Another runs a business. The latter came to the US not knowing a word of English, found work, and ultimately took over the business. Neither has the close-knit community that you emphasize.

      By the way, I do not believe that Maura is alive and in hiding, mostly for the reasons that I stated above. But could she be? Of course.

      A well-known mobster from Massachusetts, on the FBI's most wanted list during his absence in its entirety, lived in Santa Monica for nearly 20 years. He paid rent in cash and did not drive a car. His story received far more publicity than Maura's.

      I strongly believe that Maura did not disappear to start a new life; I strongly believe that she could have, if she had wanted to.

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  10. I have to agree that she is likely not alive, but disagree with your premises regarding MM. She was driven and capable of getting into WestPoint and at athletics. If she wanted to start a new life she could have. It is not impossible to find a quiet corner of the world and mind your own business.
    I do hope that she is alive and living the life she wants to lead. She had much put on her, but also much was self-inflicted. Small businesses don't always ask for social security cards, if you give them a number they are good. There are way, way too many tax evaders to believe people don't get away with it constantly. I think that's why the IRS is in business. She could have found a man, lied to him and now be living a different life as someone new. Who knows.

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  11. I have said time and time again that yes, it is possible. Yes, people are doing it. My point has been that you don't just up and do it on the spur of the moment, with no connections, no money, and no knowledge about how it works.

    Draining your bank account to buy booze is not the sign of a well thought out plan.

    And again, 3 months prior to this she was busted for carding a pizza.

    The fact that people can and do live in this and other countries illegally is not open for debate. Of course it happens. But *Maura* never demonstrated anything other than impulsive behavior and poor decision making. Nothing she had done should lead any sane person to believe she on her own could have pulled off her own disappearance.

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  12. What many people fail to aknowledge is that the minor credit card fraud we know about, we only know about because she was caught at it, that one time. We have no idea that this was her first or only act of fraud. This could have been 1 failure out of 100. Do not base her abilities on the one failure. We know she was smart, she could have been a very accomplished credit card thief who got sloppy.

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    1. Well, that and the fact that she was kicked out of West Point for shoplifting, wasn't it? Or the string of drunken car accidents.

      And it's not that she got sloppy, really. It's how incredibly stupid it was. If she was caught using a fake credit card to buy something retail, because she used the same card for a month, THAT is sloppy. Having a carded pizza delivered directly to your door isn't sloppy, it's just dumb. It demonstrates a complete lack of understanding on her part, or a complete lack of caring.

      If we are going to talk "what if...", we can say that Maura might actually be a covert CIA wetworks operator, recruited at West Point, and her "disappearance" was actually a ruse to get her in deep with the Russian mob. Once you start going into "what if" scenarios, the sky is the limit. I'm limiting my thinking to what we *know* about her. And if you analyze her behavior in the *years* leading up to the disappearance, you see impulsive acts and bad decisions, all the way down.

      I can buy that she slipped away and was living below radar, for a while. It's the extended time frame and the amount of media coverage that makes it hard for me to swallow. Someone that impulsive is going to slip up.

      But part of my original point - and something nobody has commented on - is that she didn't do it *alone*. If she had help, I believe it's more possible. Especially if she also had "handlers" - for lack of a better term - for the first few years, to make sure she didn't act impulsively, or if she did, to fix it.

      My take on this has really always been that she was upset, and her life was spiraling out of control. She packed up, bought herself some time with the "family emergency" thing, and was going to go to a familiar place, get drunk, and sort some things out. While she was getting away, *something* happened that caused the accident. I don't buy that it was part of some conspiracy, or master plan, or anything like that on her part. The accident was a mistake. Her actions up until that point scream "impulsive" not "planned". From the accident on, everything else is speculation. If she was meeting someone, maybe she was able to get them to come pick her up. But if she "went underground" so to speak, I believe the plan for that was formed in the hours or days after the accident, not before. And if that is what happened she HAD to have had help.

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    2. And to address Samuel Ledyard's point earlier about Whitey Bulger (the mobster from MA), that just proves my point. Yes they both disappeared for a long time. Yes they both had intense media coverage. But that's where the similarities end. Whitey Bulger was a career criminal, with organized crime connections, and a TON of money. I have always said it is possible to disappear if you had connections, money, and help. Whitey Bulger is absolutely the proof of that. But he has almost *zero* similarities to Maura.

      Someone show me a case that is SIMILAR (20-something young woman, wanted by police, believed to possibly be in danger, in the era of modern police equipment) who was able to go underground for an extended period of time. You can't keep talking about people who disappeared in the 70's under non-suspicious circumstances, or illegal immigrants who aren't *really* being looked for by law enforcement, or career criminals with millions of dollars and extensive underground connections and say "See, if THEY did it, so could Maura". It makes no sense.

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    3. One final thought on some of this.

      First of all, I do NOT mean to be insulting to Maura at all. But to discuss something honestly, you need to be honest.

      A lot of people keep talking about how "smart" Maura was, and how capable that would have made her in various scenarios. I don't understand where this is coming from.

      Getting good grades in high school, and being involved in after-school activities so you get into a good college, or even getting good grades at that college, are not the same thing as being "smart" or "intelligent".

      Some of the smartest people I know did very poorly in school. On the other hand, some people I know who got very good grades need explicit instructions on how to use a can opener. There is a huge difference between getting good grades in school, and actual practical intelligence.

      And no, this is not some blue collar / white collar, academics vs. salt-of-the-earth type thing. I'm very white collar. I work in a professional career. Some of the smartest people I work with failed out of college.

      There is a huge difference between the kind of smarts that get good grades in college, and the kind of smarts that help you talk your way into a fake identity, and stay below the radar of law enforcement.

      That's how I can rectify the fact that she was getting high marks in nursing school, but then turned around and had stolen merchandise delivered to her address. Those 2 "smarts" are very different things.

      I just think it's a mistake to equate getting into a good college with the street smarts to stay underground and avoid the police.

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    4. ~Getting good grades in high school, and being involved in after-school activities so you get into a good college, or even getting good grades at that college, are not the same thing as being "smart" or "intelligent"~

      you are correct, but add in an appointment to West Point and combined those things do put her in a higher class of intelligence. I think the "what if" that she was more capable due to her intelligence is more likely than the "what if" that she was less capable. We know so little about her personally that with the only given's we have point in general to a more intelligent and capable person. With the things we really know about her it is very naive to think that this was her first and only credit card theft. Sure we have no proof that she had more thefts, but I think it's much less of a stretch than thinking she wasnt smart enough to have had more.

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    5. Based on all available information it's pretty clear-cut that in terms of raw intelligence Maura is/was above average but not off the charts. What's less clear, but is my personal opinion, is that in terms of so-called "street smarts" she was at a higher level than many give her credit for (I'd put it at roughly average or slightly above average--I guess I could call that a "professional" opinion, but really it breaks down to a reasoned estimate on a thing that is not quantifiable. Whatever).

      But either way, her general level of intelligence in either sense is not really relevant. "Stupid" people are capable of executing deep, well-executed plans (and are obviously equally likely to be outright lucky as anyone else), and "smart" people are capable of doing profoundly stupid things.

      I'm pretty confident that either way she would have needed both help and a shit load of planning to have run off and started anew. I don't believe that's what she did, but I have little doubt that if that's what she really wanted to do she was fundamentally resourceful and/or connected enough to at least get off the ground in the process.

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    6. What is your theory on these vehicles?

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  13. “Samuel Ledyard's point earlier about Whitey Bulger … proves my point. Yes they both disappeared for a long time. Yes they both had intense media coverage. But that's where the similarities end. Whitey Bulger was a career criminal, with organized crime connections, and a TON of money. I have always said it is possible to disappear if you had connections, money, and help. Whitey Bulger is absolutely the proof of that. But he has almost *zero* similarities to Maura.”

    I mentioned Whitey Bulger in response to this:

    “There is a huge difference between a person wanting to live off the grid or below the radar who is not wanted by police, and someone who is. Especially someone who is, and has had national newspaper articles and TV shows about them.

    Maybe she learned to hunt, and is living way off the grid in a cave in the mountains, tanning hides for clothing, and hunting deer with a spear for food.”

    In the past ten years, Maura’s overall visibility in the media has been nothing compared to Bulger’s. Bulger, who topped the FBI’s most wanted list when he was caught, was plainly “wanted by police.”

    Instead of “living way off the grid in a cave in the mountains, tanning hides for clothing, and hunting deer with a spear for food,” Bulger lived in an apartment complex in Santa Monica, California, was a regular at a local bar, and, for exercise, walked the length of the public beach near his home.

    As to your question (“show me a case [of someone] SIMILAR [to Maura] (20-something young woman, wanted by police, believed to possibly be in danger, in the era of modern police equipment) who was able to go underground for an extended period of time”): (1) When you say that Maura is “wanted by police,” if it is your position that she is wanted by police in connection with criminal activity, then I do not agree; (2) Show me a case of someone similar to Maura (someone who crashed two cars in two days in two states) who was NOT able to go underground for an extended period of time.

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    1. The living in a cave in the woods thing was me being absurd. I was saying it in response to some of the other absurd things that people seem to believe.

      Either way, Bulger had nothing in common with Mara.

      "When you say that Maura is “wanted by police,” if it is your position that she is wanted by police in connection with criminal activity, then I do not agree; "

      Agree or not, the police are actively looking for her.

      "(2) Show me a case of someone similar to Maura (someone who crashed two cars in two days in two states) who was NOT able to go underground for an extended period of time."

      This makes absolutely no sense to me. I don't even understand what you are getting at.

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    2. "Agree or not, the police are actively looking for her."

      I suspect that James' trip to Canada was the most recent effort to locate Maura Murray alive. I suppose that we can agree to disagree on this one.

      "This makes absolutely no sense to me. I don't even understand what you are getting at."

      I considered your rhetorical question impossible to address considering the nature of Maura's case. My rhetorical question was an admittedly poor attempt to demonstrate that any hypothetical resolution of her case is improbable. Yes, it is highly unlikely that she started a new life. But is there a "likely" outcome among those that have been considered?

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    3. "I considered your rhetorical question impossible to address considering the nature of Maura's case. "

      I wasn't being rhetorical at all. People keep posting other examples of how people "went off the grid" that I don't think are similar to her situation. I am asking someone to provide a relevant example. If it is as easy as people are making it seem for a 20-something woman, believed to be in danger, with limited resources, to go underground for an extended period of time, there should be other examples of it. I'm not asking for examples of people who are *still* underground, but if it is as easy as everyone thinks, there should be a "this 20 year old girl who disappeared one day, and had an episode of 'Unsolved Mysteries' about her, suddenly reappeared 8 years later. There was even an update about it on the show." type example out there somewhere. Something like that. If it is as easy as everyone seems to think, show me *something* similar to back up the claim.

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    4. Denise Desruisseaux Bolser (24 years old) disappeared from New Hampshire in 1985 and was found in Florida in 2002. She had faked her own kidnapping.

      "Days after the disappearance, police found a pickup truck belonging to Bolser's husband abandoned at Logan Airport in Boston. Neatly arranged on the front seat were her Social Security card, birth certificate and local charge cards."

      http://www.doenetwork.org/media/news147.html

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    5. Closer. But 1985 is still a far cry from current police technology. Honestly I think this is another example that proves my point;

      "Casey plugged information about the missing woman into her computer databases and came up with a "Denise" in Florida with the same birth date, June 1, 1960"

      This is another example of someone who disappeared before we had a lot of computers linked together and sharing information, who was then found once modern technology was used. Once all of these databases were linked up, it started getting harder and harder to hide.

      2001 is when a lot of these databases started really coming online. Maura went missing after this, making it much harder.

      Anyway, I'm sick of arguing this. People can believe what they want.

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  14. I don't understand the thought that it would be difficult to go "off grid". People do it all the time. wayward family members, prodigal sons. I had a friend who started hanging around a bad crowd and he literally vanished, no one knew where he was and he eventually came back to his house months later after realizing he was with the wrong people, and he never left town! Many people live on the margins, not every one is plugged in, not every one is from a large city where they think these things are improbable.

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    1. In those examples, were there national newspaper articles, and TV shows about them? Were the police looking for them.

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    2. Crashing on your friend's couch for a month, if you are over 18, and having nobody realize where you were is not even in the same league. Even if this was reported to police, it is not *illegal* to go off the grid. So if no crime was committed, and there is no reason to believe the person is in jeopardy, nobody is *looking* for them, other than their friends.

      Contrast that with a person who is being actively sought for some reason, by local police, state police, people who can subpoena phone records, credit activity, SSN activity, security camera footage, can canvass areas, performed searches in remote places...

      It's really difficult for me to understand how nobody seems to see the difference between Maura's case and "I had a buddy who stopped going to work, and was living with some other person in town". Or "Illegal aliens do it all the time". Or "this well connected gangster who had thousands of dollars in cash, because he was a criminal who only dealt in cash, so he had thousands on hand, for this specific reason". I guess if you don't see the difference, there is nothing I can say to make you see it.

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  15. I'm sorry but I think Maura is dead. Whether by suicide or kidnapping I don't know,but I think she is dead. She didn't have unlimited funds to disappear, she wasn't that smart, she got into West Point, big deal, so do other people. I don't believe she was that smart as some people make her out to be.

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  16. Any word on book release date? What about the documentary?

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  17. New topic please, getting tired of seeing "Ed Lanpher Speaks Out"

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  18. Throw us a bone, Renner! How about posting that Tim Carpenter interview?

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  20. New topic please Im getting bored of checking everyday

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  21. Agree with others, New topic please!

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  22. James did say that he would stop if Maura contacted him ??

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  23. Does anyone know if Renner wrote these?

    http://www.yourthoughtsaboutthis.com/

    The Final Chapter entry is interesting.

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    1. This entry tracks Alden Olson's theories: http://www.yourthoughtsaboutthis.com/?p=668. I am not suggesting that Alden Olson created the site, but, I think that it bears on your question. James has not adopted Olson's theories.

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    2. Hmm..... I didn't know what to make of it. It kind of looked like it was possibly related to a class and the final chapter entry almost invites you to infer it is Renner talking about the final chapter to his book. Who is Judie? IDK - perhaps it is meant to be odd and cause questions.

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