Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Did UMass Police Use Maura Murray as Confidential Informant?


UMass police are currently caught up in a unbelievable scandal, according to the Boston Globe. Seems the university cops were in the habit of cutting deals with students they caught doing illegal things, if they would narc on their peers. It all came out when one of their confidential informants (whom they could have helped by notifying therapists and parents) overdosed and died.

At the time Maura disappeared, she had cut a deal with a local judge after UMass police caught her in a credit card fraud sting.

I wonder. Was she providing them with the names of other students involved in identity theft?

64 comments:

  1. Read the Globe story. Tragic and awful. About Maura, I would say no, I don't believe she was a CI. The police are wanting to go after bigger problems,like drugs. I don't think that the campus police would want to go after Identity Theft users because it's not a problem as big as drugs, and they may not have the manpower to even have a CI Identity Theft CI program. Plus with ID theft, it's usually open and shut. You catch one person who has stolen someone's ID, they go to jail, and the bank and CC companies handle the rest. No one ever agrees with me on my opinions on here, so I'm expecting my opinion to not be popular.

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  2. Maura's M.O. is very far removed from that of an "identity theft ring" so, no they would not have been using her as an "informant". Police use drug users to bust dealers. Maura's situation was: stealing a credit card receipt from the trash in her dorm and ordering pizza to her own room - that doesn't seem at all analogous. The two scenarios not even remotely similar.

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    1. I'm not following your logic. Maura was arrested for identity theft (not drugs) and Renner asked "I wonder. Was she providing them with the names of other students involved in identity theft?"

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  4. I'm confused about this statement- "At the time Maura disappeared, she had cut a deal with a local judge after UMass police caught her in a credit card fraud sting". Ok yes the judge cut her a deal, but I thought it was because it was the first time she had been arrested for using a stolen CC? That's common with first offenders. I had no idea it was a "sting"? I don't think it was a sting, she would have to be set up with a stolen CC by a cop for it to be considered a "sting" correct? I thought she just found a CC receipt and used it to buy pizza once? I also think Mr. Renner has edited his original post, because I read it this morning and there was nothing written about a sting. I think thats why me and Jack Spencer replied the way we did.

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    1. When I read this earlier the following was not in the post that I saw-"At the time Maura disappeared, she had cut a deal with a local judge after UMass police caught her in a credit card fraud sting." And it also read something like- Do you think Maura could have been a CI. That's why in my first reply I stated that I didn't think campus police would have the time or manpower for a identity theft CI program.

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    2. "[S]he would have to be set up with a stolen CC by a cop for it to be considered a 'sting' correct?"

      No, that would be entrapment.

      A sting is designed to catch the person in the act. In Maura's case, the reporting officer spoke with the person who delivered the pizza and, in fact, arranged a sting; as soon as Maura signed, the officers approached her and questioned her.

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    3. To elaborate on Sam's reply, maura had bought food several times on different occasions with the stolen card number. They set up the sting when she placed another order with that card number.

      I tend to think she was not a CI only because in the case cited in the BG article, no action was taken that involved another party ( a judge). The CI arrangement was set up directly between the officers and the individual. I do not believe a CI would be brought before a judge to make their situation "official". That takes their fate out of the hands of the police thus taking away the hammer they need to control the CI.

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    4. The hammer might have been expulsion from school unless she cooperated as a CI

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    5. The point is not what the hammer was, it's who is holding it. CI's don't work through a judge, they work directly with officers. In many cases not even with a PD, just individual officers within that PD.

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    6. The point I was trying to make Bill is that there was never any penalty handed down to Maura for the credit card theft which happened on school campus and involved another student. Why wasn't she expelled? I would certainly think that it would be grounds for that. I believe it is possible that the school (police) was holding the hammer on Maura in order to gather more info on other students.

      If there is a reason or possibility of having a hammer against Maura then it is possible in my mind that she may have been a CI.

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    8. Clarify: No Penalty handed down by the School

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    9. It's standard to go extremely lenient on someone if it's their first offense, with this type of crime. Especially if they are in school. If every college kid who did something this stupid was thrown out of school on their first offense, our colleges would be empty. Expelling someone from school, and limiting their education, doesn't help that person or society. If they continue to misbehave, then yes. But a first offense? No.

      There is no conspiracy here. The judge saw it for what it was: a college kid doing something stupid. There was no reason to ruin someone's life over $80 or so (taking the multiple times it was done into consideration) of stolen pizza, on a first offense.

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    1. Having witnessed the New England opiate epidemic of that era, I've always thought that in Maura's mugshot she looks like an someone with an opiate problem.

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  6. Samuel Ledyard, I agree. I miss worded what I meant when I was trying to describe a sting.

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  7. Maybe Maura was buying drugs as well?

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  8. This does make me think of how she didn't get in trouble during the first accident for drunk driving - that always seemed a little weird. But I don't think identity theft is a common crime by college students: except maybe fake IDs for drinking, though maura was already of age - and I doubt she was stealing/selling others fake IDs. However people like her who are so focused and over achievera can get involved in drugs especially cocaina. For all we know te cops could have found something of the sort on her during the first accident that we wouldn't know of (or at a party, etc.).

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    1. I keep asking this, but never get a reply. Are nursing students or college track team members tested for drugs? Does anybody know?

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  9. You know, I really started off wanting to read your book, James. Now I'm not so sure...

    So there are 2 facts that we know.

    1) She got busted for using a stolen credit card.
    2) The UMass police use students as CIs.

    And from that you are now theorizing that Maura could have been a CI for some form of Identity theft ring? Seriously that doesn't strike you as a ridiculous leap?

    First of all, credit card fraud is not the same thing as our current definition of "Identity Theft". Identity theft has a lot more to do with impersonating someone to secure some form of payment or credit in their name. Using a stolen credit card to buy a pizza is not identity theft, it's fraud.

    Second, stop thinking about things from a 2014 perspective. "Identity Theft" didn't have the same weight that it does now, in 2004. I seriously doubt that the UMass police even had Identity Theft on their radar in 2004, let alone that it would have been important enough to run CIs to look for "rings" at the school. CI's are almost always used for drugs, as this article seems to support.

    Making a leap is one thing; Making this BIG of a leap is akin to tabloid journalism.

    I am starting to have a really bad feeling that you don't really have anything of substance for your book, and instead it's going to be a sensationalized story that drags Maura's name through the mud, with innuendo. Basically, I'm afraid you are going to write the very book that her parent's were afraid you were going to write. You know that if that happens, all you have done is given them ammunition, to warn other people about not talking with investigative journalists, right?

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    1. To the commenter with all the letters and numbers as your name, I agree.
      "First of all, credit card fraud is not the same thing as our current definition of "Identity Theft". Identity theft has a lot more to do with impersonating someone to secure some form of payment or credit in their name. Using a stolen credit card to buy a pizza is not identity theft, it's fraud." Yes that's correct. Someone in 2006 broke the window out of my Saturn and used my credit card at 6 different places, the guy that did this had a criminal history of 20 years, and he was charged with 6 counts of CC fraud, not ID theft. And this- "Second, stop thinking about things from a 2014 perspective. "Identity Theft" didn't have the same weight that it does now, in 2004. I seriously doubt that the UMass police even had Identity Theft on their radar in 2004, let alone that it would have been important enough to run CIs to look for "rings" at the school. CI's are almost always used for drugs, as this article seems to support." Is exactly what I believe and tried to state in my earlier comment, I just didn't state it as well as you did.

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    2. Identity theft can also be obtained through picking through peoples trash

      " Criminals Love Trash

      The next period in the history of identity theft popularized the use of the personal paper shredder. While identity theft via the phone was becoming fairly well known to the general public, thieves found another method for gathering personal information. Criminals began going through trash looking for credit card and bank account statements as well as other personal identifiers. During the 80s, victims did not even consider that their garbage might be a means to steal their identities. As this approach became acknowledged through news reports and other alerts, the general public began investing in personal paper shredders. "

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    3. Becki - I have no idea why AIM is choosing to represent my name that way. I don't mind it though. :) Thanks.

      jwb - Hackers have been using that concept since the 80's at least. They would usually refer to it as "trashing". It was mostly to get username/password combinations that people threw out, or additional information about systems they were targeting. Hell, this was demonstrated in the movie "Sneakers". So yes, criminals going through someone's trash has been going on a long time. I don't understand your point though.

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  10. In my opinion, credit card theft and identity theft go hand and hand and it definitely existed in 2004. No question Maybe Maura spilled her guts to the cops about a bigger problem in order to keep things quiet from her dad.

    Did Fred know about the credit card theft? That would say a lot

    If yes then her past would have meant something to her disappearance and if the answer is No then why not?.

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  11. Face the facts:

    Maura was a thief and a liar.So to say people are dragging Mauras reputation through the mus is absurd based on the facts.

    1) she stole: fact
    2) she lied : fact

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    1. There is a huge difference between stating facts, as you so eloquently put it above, and speculation. Speculating that she was a CI is not a fact. Digging into her past and stating that she has participated in orgies - fact or not - has no relevance on the case. This is where my "dragging her name through the mud" comment comes into play.

      Again, this website seems to have a hard time with comparisons.

      If you don't understand the difference between

      "Maura was caught for credit card fraud"

      and

      "Maybe Maura was a confidential informant! And I bet she was on drugs too! "

      Than nothing I write is going to make you understand.

      People seem to be forgetting that this is not about arguing some piece of entertainment that we all find interesting. This isn't "oh I wonder what the symbols on the door mean, and what the black smoke monster is" on a Lost message board. This is a real person, most likely dead, with a real family. Whether we *like* the family or not is beside the point. This is a real family that has had to deal with the real loss of someone.

      I am 100% behind bringing facts to light that are *relevant*. I am not taking her family's side on this. If something is relevant to the case, it should be explored.

      But speculation - especially this unfounded speculation - doesn't do any good. First of all, it is potentially hurtful to both Maura and her family. Second, if the crazy speculation doesn't get reeled in, this website is going to be used as Exhibit A of "reasons not to talk with freelance journalists". This is not Topix. This is the website of a freelance investigative journalist, who is attempting to convince people to take him seriously, and work with him. Yet over the past year this journalist has started throwing out crazier and crazier speculation.

      It's starting to seem more and more like James has *nothing* new. And maybe that is ok. But posting "what ifs" that are wild speculation, just to keep people coming to your blog for *some* kind of new content is unprofessional.

      2 entries ago everyone was crying for a new entry. Then we get this; wild speculation. This blog is devolving.

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    2. "Digging into her past and stating that she has participated in orgies - fact or not - has no relevance on the case.". I agree. I don't know what having an orgy would have to do with her missing. I never bought the orgy story anyway.

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    3. If Maura became pregnant by a man at one of these orgies, and she told him that he was the father, he may have decided to kill her. Murder is the top cause of death for pregnant women, according to ABC News.To me, that's something that cannot be overlooked. Who she associated with, in whatever manner, is vital to understanding Maura and her disappearance.

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    2. Hey Ace. Not to be a grammar nazi, but the word you are looking for is "you're". As in the contraction of "you are". "Your" is possessive. As in "if you don't learn how to spell things correctly, nobody is going to take YOUR opinion seriously". "Your still" would only really be helpful if we were talking about bootleggers.
      Sorry, I don't mean to be rude or anything. It's just really hard to take anyone's opinion of the world seriously if they write like an illiterate 4th grader.

      But thank you. I'm now reminded of just why it is a waste of time to argue with people about something on the internet.

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    3. Oh and James, congrats on the "THINK tank" of admirers.

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    5. Interesting. You have extremely inconsistent capitalization, very odd spacing with your punctuation, and you frequently use the wrong version of words, yet you just used a semicolon correctly. 98% of native English speakers don't use semicolons correctly. CONSPIRACY!

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    6. There's a fair amount on this blog that I conceptually don't agree with, but dude when the grammar police show up as a primary recourse it just suggests that you either a.) have an agenda or b.) are the sort who just feels compelled to be "heard".

      I actually agree, at least in a vacuum, with a lot of what you're saying. It's fair. And there are a bunch of people on here who seemingly are in the same boat, but they still want to see this thing through (as do I) and so in cases like that of this post they just hold their tongues unless it's in reference to something directly relevant.

      If you're so deeply opposed to what's being said here to the point to where we just MUST KNOW YOUR THOUGHTS, it leads me to wonder what your specific "angle" is.

      I personally don't consider "it's better to not find out what happened to Maura as long as we can just maintain her integrity" a valid way of approaching this. If that's not what you are going for then I apologize, but that's how it comes across.

      And to be clear, I'm not fazed or affected in the slightest how salacious it's made to be; I lived Maura's worst case hypothetical plus half again, at minimum, when I was in college. To me, she was a slightly fucked up but basically average college kid at the time of her disappearance.

      If I ended up dead in the woods, which could and maybe should have happened several times over throughout my life (although because it didn't, I understand it is paradoxical as a concept here and now), I think my family would like to have some clarity on how that happened regardless of the circuitous path of tenuous and/or outright false logic that eventually led to the truth.

      I guess that's a super long-winded way of suggesting that you might have more luck with convincing people of what exactly you're trying to convey if you give some perspective on where you're coming from.

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    7. JHonez;

      All completely valid points. Regarding the grammar nazi thing, yes, you are right. And regarding the grammar stuff, no, I don't just need to be heard, and no I don't have an agenda. I will admit that I just hate the Internet at times, and this reply caught me on a bad day. I WILL fully admit to being an elitist. At times I just get SO SICK AND TIRED of taking the time to try to put forward a well thought out and at least marginally logical argument, that has been proofread and mistakes corrected (if I see them), only to have someone throw this form of response, and then have the gall to expect to be taken seriously. In the real world, if you are sitting around discussing something with people, and someone suddenly shows up, ranting and raving and unable to form a single coherent thought, that person is not taken seriously. But here on the Internet you have to endure a constant stream of morons with no communications skills, no real world insight, and absolutely no logic, and we all have to pretend like we are on the same level and everyone's opinion is valid. Sorry. Every once in a while it gets to be too much.

      So no, no agenda; just an occasional inability to suffer fools gladly. Again, I apologize.

      Regarding the "integrity" thing... That's sort of it, but not exactly. Sorry if this is long-winded, but let me frame my thoughts on this, going back to the beginning.

      I think when Renner started this project, he had nothing but the best intentions in mind. I think that he is good at what he does, and that he has had success with this kind of thing in the past. I think that when he started this project he not only believed that this case was crackable, but that he was the person to do it. But I think he underestimated 2 things. First of all, just how odd this case was going to turn out to be. Second, just how secretive (this isn't the best word... I don't mean any of the negative connotation with that, but a better word escapes me right now) and reserved around strangers that New Englanders can be. I think that when he started getting stonewalled by Maura's friends and family, he didn't take it well. I think he took it very personally, and started forming an antagonistic relationship with a lot of people involved in this case. At first, I don't think it affected his work much at all. But I also think that a lot of time has passed, and that a lot of things have been investigated, and Renner is no closer to the truth than the day he started. And I think he is frustrated, and allowing some of that antagonism to influence him.

      Personally? I think many of Maura's friends and family seem to be scumbags. I think they all have their own secrets, and are more worried about protecting them than they are in finding the truth about Maura. What I don't think is that that means they had anything to DO with her disappearance necessarily.

      So to bring it full circle, I believe that Renner is frustrated by a lack of progress, while having a very antagonistic relationship with the people he could potentially hurt. So I think that lately he has been throwing some pretty wild speculation out there, as well as things that just don't have any relevance on the case (Like the orgy thing. Her stealing might have been something the family didn't want exposed, but it was RELEVANT to her situation at the time. She had a reason to disappear. But if Maura had *consensual* sex with the entire cast and crew of Frasier one night, it has no relevance on the case. I see a difference there, maybe others don't.). I think that a lot of the things Renner has been saying and speculating about lately, are not things he would have said 3 years ago. Like I said, I think the antagonistic nature of his relationship with Maura's friends and family have stated to affect his behaviour. I also think that he has really fixated on Fred as the bad guy, and might be allowing that to influence his thought process, for this same reason.

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    8. So do I have an agenda? Yes and no, I guess. I personally don't care about Maura's family, or her reputation. If everyone and everything gets dragged through the mud, but at the end we find out what happened, it is worth it, I guess. What I am concerned with is all the other cases that are going to happen after Maura. Her case doesn't exist in a vacuum. The work that Renner and people like him do is important. So then, how important is to maintain his integrity in light of that? As I have said, my fear is that Renner becomes everything the family fears, and they are able to point the finger directly at him and say "THAT is exactly why you don't talk to freelance journalists/writers". There is more than just Maura's case on the line. Maybe the next case WOULD be solvable by an amateur writer, but that person's family won't talk to them because of what happened on this case, and how Renner behaved at the end.

      If Renner winds up finding Maura, dead or alive, and stepped on toes doing it, fine. At least then he can say "I might have pissed everyone off, but look, there she is, I solved it." If that happens, other families might take the chance. But there is a VERY real possibility here that Renner drags her name through the mud, pisses off her family, harasses her friends, and at the end of it.... nothing. We have no answer. And if THAT happens, that might have a very real impact on things bigger than Maura and her case.
      (Continued)

      So if I have any agenda, it's to see Renner maintain his integrity enough that he doesn't mess it up for the next guy. Maybe I'm being really naive, I admit that. I just see a picture bigger than just Maura.

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    9. That is for real probably the most reasonable and well-spoken thing I've ever read on this site.

      I never would have been able to even remotely piece together your angle if you hadn't put that out there. Previously you just sounded outright angry a lot of the time, but now I get why 100% (and I also feel you close to 100% although I'm for the most part past the point where I get genuinely fazed by it).

      Thank you.

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    10. Numbers guy,

      You make some very good points and you make a lot of sense. I do think however that your argument justifying the criticism of Renner is flawed. My opinion of course but I think the orgy issue, if true, is just as, if not more, relevant to her disappearance as the theft issue. The theft actually is pretty minor and is a real stretch to be a reason for her disappearance. So the petty theft for you is relevant, for me it's not. Since there are people claiming that the orgies happened, then it's no longer in the realm of speculation. It may not be verifiable, but it is certainly not wild speculation and its certainly not wild speculation on Renners part. Additionally, if the orgies happened, then it is not wildly speculative to think it somehow led to her disappearance. For years theories have abounded about what was making her run and the theft never seemed big enough. The semi-famous businessmen who opened up to Renner do not seem big enough either, but who else was taking part? It does not seem sensational to me, it seems like there is more to uncover. Now I am not saying the orgies are the key, they may turn out to be irrelevant, but to peg them as irrelevant at this point is a mistake. It is certainly too soon to call Foul on Renner for posting it. I think everything that was happening in her life at the time is relevant, including a naughty romp with the cast and crew of Frasier. (Terrifying visual btw)

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    11. Bill H, why are orgies relevant to her disappearance? I don't believe the orgies even happened, or we would have heard of them way before now. Just because some men said they had an Orgy with Maura, doesn't make it true. Sad how everyone believes the men, with no proof.

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    12. Becky, I did nat say the orgies were relevant, I just said that if true, they would be. I don't think we can say emphatically they did happen but they are not pure speculation either. Someone said they happened, more than one person even. To dismiss it outright is a mistake. It definitely needs more investigation. Then, if true, could explain her running in many ways better than other scenarios. I don't believe my post above said, at all, what you took from it.

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    13. Numbers Guy,
      . I agree with what you have written.
      It bothers me to think Mr Renner will publish a sensationalist tabloid story about this case.

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    14. Bill H, no problem. That's why I asked if the orgies were relevant. I wasn't sure if I was understanding your comment, or if I was taking it out of context. My only problem with the whole orgy thing is why would these men wait so long to say anything? And where is the proof they actually knew Maura? I can't remember if Renner explained that. For all we know, it could just be some guys who may or may not have attended college with Maura. People lie all the time.

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    15. Renners post seems to indicate that the orgies happened. "Confirmed by 3 members of the track team." The confirmation process, to us, remains questionable as we do not know how he confirmed and if there was collusion between the 3 men. Renner also says they fear being outed which indicates to me that, if Renner was doing his job correctly, he went with a tip and approached them, not that one or more of them came forward to Renner. Three people having the same story if investigated properly could lend the story some credibility. I would be more suspicious if one or all came forward at the same time but then there raises a question of motivation. Why make up the story and come forward with it at all, 10 years later. The way Renner presents it, I tend to believe it, assuming of course his investigative technique was sound. Renner seems convinced. The real question I guess is does a gang bang or two mean anything to her disappearing, I say it might even though Renner does not address it. He just wants to know if she said anything about leaving in the middle of the orgy which seems unlikely. Group sex is not a deep thinking conversation venue. So I think that if they happened, there could have been other participants that are much more than semi-famous businessmen or maura heard or saw things that she shouldn't have. At least that's the direction I would take if I was the investigator.

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    16. Bill H, "The confirmation process, to us, remains questionable as we do not know how he confirmed and if there was collusion between the 3 men". That's what bothers me about the orgy story,the confirmation process.

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  13. "At the time Maura disappeared, she had cut a deal with a local judge after UMass police caught her in a credit card fraud sting." What was the deal that was cut between the judge and Maura? If it was just probation, I don't really consider that a deal. It's common the first time that someone gets charged with CC fraud to get probation, in our state it's a misdemeanor, unless you have done it before. The guy that stole my CC had a 20 year rap sheet and the judge let him pled to like 6 counts of CC fraud,which were misdemeanors, not felonys. The DA was mad about this,I remember him telling me so.

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  14. “Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me... Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.”
    ― Shel Silverstein :)

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  15. I have gone through different blogs but your blog is one of the most wonderful blog, nice work.
    Sex Toys

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    1. I wonder if these sex toys had anything to do with Maura's disappearance. Hell, maybe she was involved in an underground sexy toy distribution ring, until Adam and Eve Adult Store found out and had to eliminate the competition.

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  16. http://mauramurray.blogspot.com/2011/07/big-reveal-maura-might-have-been.html?m=1

    I forgot about the pregnant theory and the searches found on her computer. More reasons I think her remains are in the White Mountains

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    1. jabroni, I don't think Maura is alive. I don't know if she was kidnapped or took her own life but I don't believe she is alive. I would think that if she were alive, she would at least try to contact her father to say something like, I'm ok, I'm alive, I just want to pretend I'm dead so I don't get in trouble for the stuff I've done, and don't tell anyone I'm alive. I know that's a far fetched thing for her to do, contact her dad and say all that, but if I wanted to pretend I were dead or missing, I would at least tell my mom and swear her to secrecy. I couldn't put my mother through wondering if I were dead or alive.

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    2. Well, have to unofficially proclaim this blog dead. The book is written and being edited so throwing an occasional bone is too much to ask apparently. I think our purpose has been served.

      I do hope, in my heart, that she is alive and living a life that allows her solace and peace. Most likely she is dead. If so, I think it is more likely that she was hit by a passing motorist and hidden in the woods to protect the motorist from manslaughter charges, especially if the they were under the influence. I've met a habitual drunk driver walking down the road right after a spectacular wreck and even though she was bleeding from the head she was willing to do anything to evade the police. I thought she was delirious from the wreck, but my wife smelled her booziness from a distance. I told her we were calling the police and to stay there so she could be treated for her injuries and she flipped out, cussed at us, and sprinted into some woods at high speed.

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    3. I think she has likely passed as well. I think it was a suicide, drinking and exposure to elements in the White Mountains. Tandem driver has never been proven, doesn't support any of the facts known. However, I am open minded to other possibilities. Just need more facts. I don't find it impossible though that she left on her own and has not contacted her family, especially if they are a source of her problem. I find it odd that the father has stated basically that what ever the reason she left does not have a bearing on where she might be. I think he is hiding something to protect himself or her. I just don't know if that reason sheds light on what happened to her.

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    4. Reading missing person sites for years now has shown me that many people run away and never get in contact with loved ones.

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  17. I think I have to bid this blog adieu. This was a terrific and captivating distraction that allowed me to dwell on the possibilities of MM being alive. Everyone loves a mystery and a real life mystery that allows the average citizen to leverage social media to 'help' is exciting. It shows how far things have come and can go in the future.
    If James Renner is even monitoring this anymore, perhaps one more entry that invites loyal posters and readers to give their best concise opinion as to her fate.
    Its been great creating a positive discourse with you all.

    Be Well.

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  18. I'm in the same camp as rcoopr. There's just nothing new to latch on to with this case. Nothing compelling has really been discovered since the week she went missing to point to what happened. What I have learned about missing cases, is more often than not the most likely thing to happen is usually what really happened. So the most likely thing in this case to me is she ran off in to the White Mountains and met her demise by accident or suicide.

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  19. Plausible theory. Anything can happen, and often not good, if one is exposed as a narc. I am not saying this is a pet theory for me, but given the current scandal and lack if answers in Maura's case, anything is possibkle. All avenues certainly must be explored.

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  20. Yes, Occam's razor, that's what it is referred to

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