Sunday, September 27, 2015

Not Without Precedent


A young college student vanishes without a trace.

People believe she met with foul play.

A crazy man suggests he murdered her.

Police find her, years later, living a new life.

Woman explains she secretly squirreled away money and has been using other names and paying all her bills with cash.

She wants nothing to do with her estranged family.

Quite a story. Read more here.

12 comments:

  1. Wow... This is crazy! I hope if this is what Maura did, I hope she feels at peace in her new life.

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  2. Attaining a new identity would have been much easier in the early 80s, and in Germany at that. The US uses Social Security numbers for employment, background checks, etc., does Germany have such a requirement?

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    1. If a case isn't federal, using your SSN in another state won't trigger anything.

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  3. It's not out of the question that Maura is still alive. I can't seem to stick with one theory of what happened to her for too long. It's a true mystery.

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  4. When I first went onto the Helena Murray site, Maura's family and their partisans-to include Helena-all were quite angry at a poster who called herself Cyberlaw because this individual said that she worked with people from troubled families and she maintained that such people often decide that they would be better off ditching their family and moving on for good. In essence, she said that Maura fit right in with those who make the decision to take off and never look back. They would much rather convince themselves that Maura had been murdered by a scumbag up New Hampshire-way.

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  5. This is a great example on how a person can disappear and stay hidden for years. Its a lot easier for a person to change there identity then people want to believe. Especially if they aren't Wanted by the law. You have people that are wanted by the law that stay hidden for a long time, or sometimes years.

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  6. Check your spelling, Jumbo.

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  7. Sure, Maura might be alive. But, after 10+ years, why is that any more likely than her being deceased? I try to be respectful of all but the most far-out views on the case, simply because there's so little upon which to premise any firm conclusions. I lean towards foul play being the cause of her disappearance simply because it's a relatively straightforward explanation. It's undoubtedly true that there are people who run away to start new lives and manage to avoid detection for over a decade. It's also true that, notwithstanding statistical improbability, crimes of opportunity occasionally happen in rural areas. And, as I've discussed in other posts, just because Maura's friends and family are keeping quiet about her activities in the timeframe immediately preceding her disappearance, that does necessarily mean that they know what happened to her.

    I'm not sticking up for her family and friends. They undoubtedly could put a lot of the rumors and innuendo surrounding the case to rest if they would just be a bit more forthcoming. All I'm saying is that it's not outrageous to believe that they have something to hide (possibly about her activities prior to the accident or what caused her to travel north), but do not actually know what happened to her.

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  8. Not to be the spelling police, but it's PRECEDENT without the "i".

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  9. Maybe she had a fake ID made in college to purchase alcohol and it was under a fake name and she used that along with a smile to obtain whatever employment and or other forms of ID she needed. Just a thought.

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  10. It's entirely possible, without question. But is it common? Not really. Many more folks are either found alive in less than a decade or eventually found deceased. So in this case what do we have? Either Maura is one of the exceptional few, or she is deceased. Before vesting too much into one scenario I look to many comparable scenarios, most of which don't have a happy ending. Some, like this article remind you it is possible, just not something I'd consider common...or probable.

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