Saturday, April 7, 2018

New Podcast Delves Into the Pyschology of Maura Murray


Host Ryan Kraus takes a deep dive into the mystery and applies psychology to Maura Murray's disappearance in a search for answers. It is fascinating. And worth the time to get into. Click here to listen.

17 comments:

  1. This rings true for me, as no other theory has.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wow, this guy has it figured out. So many of the rabbit holes I lost sleep over are explained and it always bothered me that she seemed to have some major dark issues, despite her achievements. On the various blogs they seem to thrive in so many details and condemning Renner who has devoted more time than the rest of them combined. I can rest believing this.

    ReplyDelete
  3. People who have first hand experience with something easily recognize it.

    I sent this to my friend, who needs it, but probably won't listen.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I've always felt the only closure Fred needs is to come to terms with his demons and do some affirmations. Maybe make amends with people he's disowned.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I agree with this and relate to parts.

    If Maura had no concern for others, why'd she return belongings to peers? Why'd she do a homework assignment jsut prior to leaving? Or could you chalk it up to the good side peeking through desperate to find solace, yet can't overpower the dark side?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It says she was planning to return and her problems didn't lead to total disregard for others. She really tried to be the great person her potential inspired. Good catch though. Just feel so relieved to eliminate all the third parties that were such a stretch. I still wondered about the five day off grid for Bill. Kind of a concern.

      Delete
  6. Was the homework a group assignment? I wonder if her doing those things had to do with preserving her image in those peoples eyes as however it was she felt they viewed her? Just an idea. I felt this gave an incredible insight into her behavior.

    ReplyDelete
  7. This is ABSOLUTELY INCREDIBLE. This man is a genius, so on point and his choice of words are exquisite. I am just so blow away I think for the first time I am left speechless. I agree with him 100% on all accounts. I also did believe Mauras case was something that happened that was very simple and that over the years rabbit holes developed because there was just a dead end. The rabbit holes and stories have escalated so badly that all anyone does is spin their heads and run in the same circles. PLEASE, everyone it's a must read. Thanks, Renner. Looks like your original insite of Maura being a sociopath was very much on point. But, see that what happens with this case... the further you dissect and get closer to the truth the more people will tear you down and turn it on you. It's one of the reasons why this case hasn't been solved in 14 years. (Before anyone wants to attack me, these are my thoughts and what I believe.) Keep it up, Renner... you do you. xo

    ReplyDelete
  8. Ok, I am listening to this now. Stopped at around the 30 minute mark to write this. I need to point out a couple things for others who might decide to listen. Sociopathy and psychopathy are not mental illnesses. In fact, the original definition of one was “malice without madness.” The best way to explain it is, illness exists when something biological is not functioning properly. Psychopathy and sociopathy are not malfunctions. They are syndromes or elements of humanity that are missing. So not broken, missing. If you don’t have an appendix, your appendix can’t get Ill. So that was annoying when he kept referring to it as her mental illness. Furthermore, the differences between sociopaths and psychopaths is NOT highly debated amongst the medical field. It is widely misunderstood amid the lay population, but that’s about it. The only thing that is disputed concerning the two is whether or not they both exist simultaneously and how to determine who should be diagnosed with which. The differences understood and defined by experts in the field is that Psychopaths are born and sociopaths are created. Its the old nature verses nurture debate. Some believe we can have both types of people. Some believe it’s one or the other. And within that argument lies the controversy of diagnosis. But differentiating the two had never been debated. They are symptomatically identical. Just had to add that for anyone listening. You should be a critical and analytical listener if you are going to listen to this dudes podcast!

    ReplyDelete
  9. I jumped around after hearing the "light", "dark" and "TRON" references. Gobbledegook. Skipped to the last 20min where he says it's possible she sought shelter after a long jog down the road. Under a porch, in a dumpster.

    A ... dumpster.

    Then she got tossed with the rest of the trash.

    Please. Save your two hours of precious time.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I listened to a few minutes of this. It was hard to tell where it was going. Call me lazy if you will, but I'm not prepared to spend 2 and a quarter hours listening without some kind of reason to think that it will be worth it. The comments here so far don't seem encouraging. Would anyone be kind enough to summarize the line of argument and conclusion?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is a difficult listen. It's sort of spiritual/philosophical I think? Talks about how a human is pushed towards or away from the light and how Maura chose to run away from the light in nearly every situation in her life, up to and including the crash the night she went missing. I don't mean to spoil the podcast but he thinks she ran from the crash site and from the police and hid in the woods and ended up dying from exposure and/or effects of the crash.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for that summary, Richard. That's not a new scenario. of course. It's highly plausible, though I think most of those following the case tend to look for something that would provide, if not a happy ending, at least an interesting ending. Of course, our feelings about what we would like to have happened say a lot about us and nothing about what really happened. I don't see how the podcaster's philosophizing makes the conclusion any more likely either. It sounds like another instance of trying to fit the facts of the case into somebody's pre-existing preferred narrative. Personally, I think that it's far more likely than not MM did die that way, just because that's the only scenario that doesn't require a lot of ad hoc assumptions. But the only way we'll ever know is if her body is discovered. Spinning a moral fable around her death doesn't prove anything except the human need to find meaning in apparently random events.

      Delete
  11. Absolutely 100% worth it. It's undortunate it takes a bit to get going but after the first 15 minutes or so it makes more sense than anything else I've ever heard. An atounding piece of analysis.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I liked that a lot. And to be honest, JR, when you called Maura a sociopath, I was unconvinced. But this guy made a similar point in a way that I found (no offense meant) far more convincing. And this leaves me curious about something: you walked it back after saying it. Are you leaning in that direction again? Because I kind of am, myself.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I wish he'd gotten to the point more efficiently, though I respect his right to share his views on his own podcast.

    The podcast didn't convince me that Maura was a sociopath. I think it's just as likely that she was a young woman who was under tremendous pressure and had become depressed. Maybe she found drinking to be temporary escape from her problems, and realized too late that it had become a problem in itself. Even if we believe that Fred had always cleaned up her messes, the makeup and credit-card thefts could be viewed as desperate attempts to push him to put his foot down and make her face her own bad behavior. Maybe her crashing the Toyota was that last straw and he finally became angry enough to tell her something had to change. And, although it's what she needed, she didn't take it well. If she were already feeling vulnerable, her father's anger and disappointment likely would have been that much more awful for her. That seems like a simpler explanation, and I think most things are simple.

    ReplyDelete